Que’Nique Mykte Newbill

Former Herbert Scoville Junior Peace Fellow | Research Analyst

This is the profile of a former staff member, affiliate, intern, or guest author. Biographical information is not maintained and may be out of date.

Que Newbill is a Scoville Fellow and Research Analyst with the Middle East Program at Stimson, where his work examines the Arab world’s shifting political landscape, ongoing economic challenges, and evolving security threats in the midst of the Arab uprisings. His particular focus is on Arab youth, Jordan’s reform movement, and Yemen’s political transition. He is also a contributor to Mideast Youth, an international forum of Middle East and North Africa commentatorsPrior to joining Stimson, he worked as a lead associate on a California health and demography-related project. Before that, Que worked as a research intern at the Center for Strategic Studies (Amman) and studied Arabic in Jordan. He has held internships with the International Rescue Committee, Al Urdun Al Jadid Research Center, and other international NGOs. Que holds a B.A. in Political Science from Grinnell College.

Recent Publications

Jordan’s Forgotten Youth Woes,”
Diplomatic Courier | March 19, 2013 

Jordan’s Year-Long Vote for Regime or Revolt,”
OpenDemocracy | January 24, 2013 

Parliamentary Elections in Jordan – Change or More of the Same?,”
Muftah | January 21, 2013 

Innovative Startups Present New Promise For Arab Transitions,”
Stimson Spotlight | December 2, 2012 

Why Syria May Be The Catalyst For Jordan’s Arab Spring,”
Stimson Spotlight | November 5, 2012 

 

Research & Writing

Commentary
Jordan’s Forgotten Youth Problem

By Que’Nique Mykte’ Newbill – King Abdullah’s post-election euphoria disguises the enduring challenge of youth political participation in Jordan. The country’s western allies have adopted a similar relaxed posture towards the palace-led reforms. Yet th…

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