In 2011 and in partnership with the Permanent Mission of Japan to the United Nations, Stimson launched the Turtle Bay Security Roundtable. This series of multistakeholder meetings provide an opportunity for UN Member States, international and regional organizations, think-tanks and civil society organizations, and private industry to come together, set aside their talking points, and discuss pressing security challenges in an off-the-record workshop setting. Below you will find summary reports from previous roundtable events.

 


Eigth Event: On March 23, 2018, the Permanent Mission of Japan to the United Nations hosted the eighth meeting of the Turtle Bay Security Roundtable series. The event was organized in cooperation with the Stimson Center, an independent think tank dedicated to global security and development. Under the theme Managing the Frontiers of Technology, the meeting convened UN Member States, members of the Group of Experts of the 1540 Committee and other subsidiary organs of the Security Council, and experts from think tanks, industry, and academia to discuss implications of the evolving technology for international security. The event featured a formal address by Secretary-General Mr. António Guterres and panel discussions with Ms. Izumi Nakamitsu (Under-Secretary General for Disarmament), Mr. Clifton Leaf (Fortune Magazine), Mr. Kevin Cuddy (General Electric), Ms. Amy Kruse (The Platypus Institute), and Mr. Jack Clark (Open AI).

To view the conference summary report, please click here

 

Seventh Event: On March 27, 2015, the Permanent Missions of Japan, Turkey, and Poland to the United Nations hosted the seventh meeting of the Turtle Bay Security Roundtable seriesThe event was organized in cooperation with the Stimson Center, an independent think tank dedicated to global security. Under the theme Public-Private Cooperation at the Nexus of Global Trade, the meeting convened UN Member States, members of UN Security Council Panels of Experts and other subsidiary organs, and experts from think tanks, industry, and academia to discuss the complex web of security risks rooted in global trade flows. The event featured a keynote address by Mr. Irwin Nack (Bank of Tokyo-Mitsubishi UFJ) and a panel discussion with Mr. Jeff Merrell (Rolls-Royce North America), Ms. Kathleen Palma (General Electric), and Dr. Kazuto Suzuki (Hokkaido University).

To view the conference summary report, please click here

 

Sixth Event: On Wednesday, March 26, 2014, the Permanent Missions of Japan, Turkey, and Poland to the United Nations hosted the Turtle Bay Security Roundtable: Managing the Next Generation of Weapons Threats. The seminar was held in cooperation with Stimson, a civil society think tank focused on global security. The three-year-old forum offers a crucial opportunity to engage in frank, candid discussions while getting the chance to collect outside views and opinions from learned experts. The sixth meeting of the Turtle Bay Security Roundtable examined the diffusion and potential use of new, technologically-advanced weapons, while also considering innovative approaches to their control by applying the lessons of previous nonproliferation and arms control efforts. While States focus on obligations related to conventional weapons, other weapons systems – mostly outside the scope of the Arms Trade Treaty (ATT) and other conventional control mechanisms – have emerged as potential new challenges. About 90 participants representing around 40 UN Missions as well as prominent nonproliferation experts and members of civil society engaged in an interactive and in-depth discussion on this complicated yet timely subject. 

To view the agenda for the event, please click here

To view the conference summary report, please click here.

 

Fifth Event: On June 10th, 2013, the Permanent Missions of Japan, Turkey, and Poland to the United Nations hosted the Turtle Bay Security Roundtable: Twenty-First Century Proliferation: The Role of Illicit Networks. The seminar was held in cooperation with Stimson, a civil society think tank focused on global security. During the fifth installment of the Turtle Bay seminar series, participants discussed how the illicit transfer of goods, technology and money has been accelerated by globalization and how the prevalence of these illicit networks affects non-proliferation efforts. Attendees questioned, in particular, what impact the recently-signed Arms Trade Treaty would have on these illicit trades and arms proliferation. Another highlight of the seminar was a vibrant debate on the intricate mechanisms used by arms proliferators and how States could counteract this growing sophistication. More than a hundred participants representing around 50 UN Missions as well as prominent nonproliferation experts, academics, and members of civil society engaged in an interactive and in-depth discussion on this complicated yet timely subject.

To view the agenda for the event, please click here.

To view the conference summary report, please click here.

 

Fourth Event: On January 18, 2013, Managing Across Boundaries (MAB) and the Permanent Missions of Japan, Turkey, and Poland to the United Nations hosted the Turtle Bay Security Roundtable: Proliferation Challenges in a Flat World. The day-long roundtable was designed to supply UN Member States, members of the UN Panel of Experts of Security Council subsidiary organs, experts from think tanks, industry, academics, and members of civil society with an opportunity to debate the effectiveness of nonproliferation instruments and the challenges such tools face in a globalized world. At this fourth installment of the seminar, participants deliberated on the mechanics of illicit networks, sanctions evasion, and the trafficking of conventional arms and dual-use materials. Contributors particularly emphasized the impact of proliferation on economic development and human security. The event additionally featured a dialogue on how to sift through the ever-growing complexities of the trade in a globalized world in order to develop stronger international tools to thwart such harmful operations. In total, well over 100 participants representing 60 UN Missions as well as leading nonproliferation experts attended the conference. 

To view the agenda for the event, please click here.

To view the conference summary report, please click here.

 

Third Event: On May 21, 2012, MAB and the the Permanent Missions of Japan, Turkey, and Poland to the United Nations hosted the Turtle Bay Security Roundtable: Opportunities to Prevent the Proliferation of Conventional Weapons. The half-day forum aimed to provide relevant stakeholders, such as UN Member States, members of the UN Panel of Experts of Security Council subsidiary organs, experts from think tanks, academics, and members of civil society with a forum to deliberate on how to address the burgeoning proliferation of conventional weapons. At this third and most recent installment of the roundtable, representatives discussed the far-reaching consequences of the thriving illicit trade in conventional weapons. Particular focus was given to the supply sources of weapons, the mechanics of the trade, and the financial flows of the operation. The conference also featured a discussion on how to develop innovative and pragmatic approaches to curbing conventional arms proliferation. In total, more than 100 participants representing 44 UN Missions as well as leading nonproliferation experts attended the conference.

To view the agenda for the event, please click here.

To view the conference summary report, please click here.

 

Second Event: On December 5, 2011, MAB and the Permanent Missions of Japan and Poland to the United Nations co-hosted the Turtle Bay Security Roundtable: Navigating the Sanctions Regime, Promoting Proliferation Prevention. The half-day UN conference was designed to provide an open forum for representatives of UN Member States, members of UN Panel of Experts of Security Council subsidiary organs, regional experts, industry representatives, experts from think tanks, and members of civil society to discuss how to address the evolving proliferation challenges present in today's increasingly interconnected and globalized landscape. Stakeholders from the relevant sectors explored the effective implementation of current nonproliferation efforts. Particular emphasis was given to sanctions focusing on North Korea and Iran, while also incorporating recent relevant developments in Libya. The conference also included a regional focus, and, as such, participants delved into the benefits of applying targeted innovative regional approaches to nonproliferation and capacity-building. In all, more than 120 participants representing around 50 UN missions as well as leading regional and nonproliferation experts attended the event.

To view the agenda for the event, please click here.

To view the conference summary report, please click here.

 

First Event: On May 21, 2011, MAB and the Permanent Missions of Japan, Poland, and Turkey to the United Nations co-hosted the Turtle Bay Security Roundtable: Promoting the Global Instruments of Nonproliferation and Disarmament.  The one-day UN conference was designed to provide a forum for stakeholders in relevant sectors government; international and regional organizations; think-tanks and civil society organizations; private industry - to openly discuss the evolving proliferation and disarmament challenges posed by today's highly globalized economic and political landscape. The event also encouraged participants to formulate new strategies to overcome emerging proliferation threats, as well as strengthen existing nonproliferation initiatives under the auspices of the United Nations. In all, more than 150 participants representing 62 UN missions as well as leading experts in the area attended the event.

To view the agenda for the event, please click here.

To view the conference summary report, please click here.