Emerging Space Challenges


DateThursday, June 5, 2014
Time12:30 – 2:00 PM
LocationThe Stimson Center 1111 19th Street, NW – 12th Floor Washington, D.C.

Space is becoming increasingly congested, contested, and competitive. The United States and the Soviet Union managed to cooperate as well as compete in space, as evident by collaborative efforts on the International Space Station. Despite testing anti-satellite weapons (ASATs), Moscow and Washington steered clear of confrontations in space. Now, future US-Russian space cooperation is in doubt, and China as well as the United States, have demonstrated ASAT capabilities. Will competition crowd out cooperation in the decade ahead?

Crowded OrbitsDrawing from his new book, Crowded Orbits: Conflict and Cooperation in Space (Columbia University Press, 2014), James Clay Moltz of the Naval Postgraduate School examines this core issue of national and international security.

Scott Pace, Director of the Space Policy Institute at George Washington University, serves as commentator. From 2005-2008, Scott served as the Associate Administrator for Program Analysis and Evaluation at NASA. His research interests include civil, commercial, and national security space policy, and the management of technical innovation.

Speaker:

James Clay Moltz, Professor, Naval Postgraduate School 

Commentator:

Scott Pace, Director of the Space Policy Institute, George Washington University 

Moderator:

Michael Krepon, Co-founder and Director of the Space Security Program, The Stimson Center

James Clay Moltz is a professor at the Naval Postgraduate School and holds a joint appointment in the Department of National Security Affairs and the Space Systems Academic Group. He is the author of The Politics of Space Security: Strategic Restraint and the Pursuit of National Interests and Asia's Space Race: National Motivations, Regional Rivalries, and International Risks. He has appeared on National Public Radio’s “Science Friday” and has written on space topics for the Boston Globe, Nature, The New York Times, and the San Francisco Chronicle.

Scott Pace is the Director of the Space Policy Institute and a Professor of Practice in International Affairs at George Washington University’s Elliott School of International Affairs.  His research interests include civil, commercial, and national security space policy, and the management of technical innovation.  From 2005-2008, he served as the Associate Administrator for Program Analysis and Evaluation at NASA.  Prior to NASA, Dr. Pace was the Assistant Director for Space and Aeronautics in the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP).  He received a Bachelor of Science degree in Physics from Harvey Mudd College in 1980; Masters degrees in Aeronautics & Astronautics and Technology & Policy from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1982; and a Doctorate in Policy Analysis from the RAND Graduate School in 1989.

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