Resources & Climate
Project

Wildlife and Natural Resources Security

Researching and designing solutions to combat the illegal trafficking, and the unsustainable trade of wildlife and natural resources
Project Info

Wildlife trafficking and natural resource theft hurts communities and the animals and ecosystems they depend on, while contributing to transnational organized crime. Illegal wildlife trade is valued at an estimated $5-23 billion. The Wildlife & Natural Resource Security project works to identify, develop, and field test practical solutions to fight natural resource theft, building proofs of concept and educating stakeholders. Most recently, between 2013-2017, Stimson worked with partners across sectors to develop a command, control, and communications (C3) system to enhance the rangers’ ability to enforce and protect Tsavo West National Park in Kenya.

A variety of stakeholders are working to combat illegal wildlife trade from its source through the supply chain to market destinations. Efforts to support investigations, law enforcement and prosecution all designed to break-up illegal networks are often hampered by a lack of useful and compatible data and information. In 2017, Stimson partnered with the U.S. Department of State and Michigan State University to host a workshop on leveraging geographic information to combat wildlife trafficking.

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