A Question of Time: Enhancing Taiwan’s Conventional Deterrence Posture

November 9, 2018 | 9:30am - 11:00am
The Stimson Center

The future of Taiwan, a flourishing liberal democracy and vibrant economy, is anything but secure. China, regarding it as a renegade province, has not renounced the use of military force to resolve the standoff. Taiwan must deter China’s aggression, taking steps to convince Chinese leaders that the costs of waging war on Taiwan will outweigh any possible benefits. In a new monograph, “A Question of Time: Enhancing Taiwan’s Conventional Deterrence Posture,” a team of researchers at George Mason University and the University of Waterloo examine a holistic strategy that Taiwan can use to enhance its conventional deterrence posture. Their conclusions are simple but radical: Taiwan must intensely prepare an asymmetric deterrence and challenge orthodoxies in its strategic thinking.

WHAT: A presentation and panel discussion launching “A Question of Time: Enhancing Taiwan’s Conventional Deterrence Posture” by Michael A. Hunzeker, Assistant Professor, Schar of Policy and Government, George Mason University, and Alexander Lanoszka, Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science, Balsillie School of International Affairs, University of Waterloo.

WHERE: The Stimson Center, 1211 Connecticut Avenue, NW, 8th Floor, Washington DC, 20036

WHEN: Friday, November 9, 2018, 9:30 a.m. – 11:00 a.m.

RSVP: Click here to RSVP for this event.

FOLLOW: @StimsonCenter on Twitter for event news and use #StimsonNow to join the conversation.

FEATURING:

MICHAEL A. HUNZEKER, Assistant Professor, Schar School of Policy and Government, George Mason University.

Michael A. Hunzeker is an assistant professor at George Mason University’s Schar School of Policy and Government and is the associate director of the school’s Center for Security Policy Studies. His studies on war termination, military adaptation, and conventional deterrence have appeared in Security Studies, the Journal of Strategic Studies, PS: Politics and Political Science, Parameters, Defense One and the RUSI Journal. He recently coauthored a forthcoming Strategic Studies Institute monograph on conventional deterrence in northeastern Europe with Alexander Lanoszka. Michael served in the U.S. Marine Corps from 2000–2006 and holds an A.B. from the University of California, Berkeley as well as a Ph.D., M.P.A., and A.M. from Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School.

ALEXANDER LANOSZKA, Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science, Balsillie School of International Affairs, University of Waterloo.

Alexander Lanoszka is an assistant professor in the Department of Political Science and a Fellow at the Balsillie School of International Affairs at the University of Waterloo. He previously lectured at City, University of London where he is still an Honorary Fellow. His research on alliance politics, nuclear strategy, and war termination has appeared in International Security, International Affairs, Security Studies, the RUSI Journal, and elsewhere. He has recently published a book called Atomic Assurance: The Alliance Politics of Nuclear Proliferation (with Cornell University Press) and a Strategic Studies Institute monograph with Michael Hunzeker on conventional deterrence in northeastern Europe. He received postdoctoral fellowships at the Massachusetts Institute for Technology and Dartmouth College. Alexander holds a Ph.D. and A.M. from Princeton University, and a B.A. from the University of Windsor.

SCOTT KASTNER, Professor, Department of Government and Politics, University of Maryland, College Park.

Scott L. Kastner is a Professor in the Department of Government and Politics, University of Maryland, College Park. He graduated from Cornell University (1995) and received his Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of California, San Diego (2003). Much of Kastner's research focuses on the international politics of East Asia, and he teaches classes on international relations, US-China relations, international political economy, and East Asia. He is author of Political Conflict and Economic Interdependence across the Taiwan Strait and Beyond (Stanford University Press, 2009), and co-editor (with Ming-Chin Monique Chu) of Globalization and Security Relations across the Taiwan Strait: In the Shadow of China (Routledge, 2015). His work has also appeared in the following journals: International Security, Journal of Conflict Resolution, International Studies Quarterly, Comparative Political Studies, Security Studies, Journal of Peace Research, Foreign Policy Analysis, Journal of Contemporary China, Journal of East Asian Studies, Issues and Studies and Current History.

YUN SUN, Co-Director, East Asia Program, Stimson (Moderator).

Yun Sun is Co-Director of the East Asia Program and Director of the China Program at the Stimson Center. Her expertise is in Chinese foreign policy, U.S.-China relations and China's relations with neighboring countries and authoritarian regimes. From 2011 to early 2014, she was a Visiting Fellow at the Brookings Institution, jointly appointed by the Foreign Policy Program and the Global Development Program, where she focused on Chinese national security decision-making processes and China-Africa relations. From 2008 to 2011, Yun was the China Analyst for the International Crisis Group based in Beijing, specializing on China's foreign policy towards conflict countries and the developing world. Prior to ICG, she worked on U.S.-Asia relations in Washington, D.C. for five years. Yun earned her master's degree in international policy and practice from George Washington University, as well as an M.A. in Asia Pacific studies and a B.A. in international relations from Foreign Affairs College in Beijing.